Finance and Management

ENTR902 Insights Into Entrepreneurship

23 April 2023 16:15 PM | UPDATED 12 months ago

ENTR902 Insights Into Entrepreneurship :

ENTR902 Insights Into Entrepreneurship
ENTR902 Insights Into Entrepreneurship

6 credit points

Subject Information

Trimester 1, 2023 Wollongong On Campus

Trimester 1, 2023 Sydney On Campus

Trimester 1, 2023 UOW Online, Distance

UOW may need to change teaching locations, teaching delivery and/or assessment delivery at short notice to ensure the safety and well-being of students and staff in response to the COVID-19 pandemic or other public health requirements.

For up-to-date information on the impact of COVID-19 please refer to your subjects Moodle site.

This subject will include both On Campus and Online Remote Study teaching options** as detailed in the Lecture & Tutorial Sections of this outline. Please note that all class components can be undertaken online to accommodate both staff and students’ changing circumstances throughout the session

Vision, Mission and PRME

Our mission is to inspire and develop globally-minded and socially responsible community members and leaders, through high-quality teaching, impactful research and meaningful engagement with community, government, industry and academic partners. The full Vision and Mission statements can be found at https://www.uow.edu.au/business-law/schools-entities/business/about-us/vision-and-mission/

We are a signatory to the Principles of Responsible Management Education (PRME) and support the realisation of the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals. More information on PRME can be found at at https://business.uow.edu.au/about/index.html

TEACHING STAFF

Teaching RoleCoordinator and Lecturer
NameMs Makrita Solitei
Telephone02 – 4221 5936
Email[email protected]
Room40.248 (Wollongong)
Consultation TimesMonday11:00 -12:30 (or by appointment online)

IMPORTANT INFORMATION FOR ALL STUDENTS

This important information must be read together with the Sydney Business School Student Handbook which contains relevant information on University of Wollongong (UOW) and Sydney Business School Policies. The handbook is found at https://moodle.uowplatform.edu.au/course/view.php?id=26396. It is your responsibility to comply with these policies and processes.

The Sydney Business School is the graduate business school of the Faculty of Business and Law at University of Wollongong. Our courses are delivered from campuses located at Circular Quay in Sydney and Wollongong as well as University of Wollongong Dubai.

Expectations of Students

UOW values are intellectual openness, excellence and dedication, empowerment and academic freedom, mutual respect and diversity, recognition and performance. We will provide a safe, equitable and orderly environment for the University community, and expect each member of our community to behave responsibly and ethically (UOW Student Conduct Rules https://documents.uow.edu.au/about/policy/learning/index.html ).

We expect that students demonstrate these values and professional behaviour, both face to face and online, making genuine efforts to complete their studies successfully, arriving on time to class, taking part constructively in class discussions and activities, demonstrating appropriate professional and ethical conduct in all communication with UOW staff and community members, and submitting assignments on time (or completing a request for Academic Consideration in advance if needed).

Communication and eLearning Etiquette

Guidelines on the use of email to contact teaching staff, mobile phone use in class and information on the university guide to eLearning ‘Netiquette’ can be found at https://www.uow.edu.au/student/learningcoop/software/emailetiquette/index.html

Cyber Bullying

Student Conduct Rules and related policies including the IT Acceptable Use Policy and Bullying Prevention Policy, whether undertaking their studies face-to-face, online.

For more information on appropriate communication and etiquette in the online environment please refer to the guide Online and Email Etiquette or at https://www.uow.edu.au/student/learning-co-op/technology-and- software/email-etiquette/.

Copyright

Commonwealth of Australia

Copyright Regulations 1969

©2023 University of Wollongong

The original material prepared for this guide is covered by copyright. Apart from fair dealing for the purposes of private study, research, criticism or review, as permitted under the Copyright Act, no part may be reproduced by any process without written permission.

Table of Contents

Faculty of Business and Law……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 1

SECTION A: GENERAL INFORMATION………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 5

SUBJECT DESCRIPTION………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 5

STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES……………………………………………………………………………………………………… 5

UPDATES TO THIS SUBJECT………………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 5

EXTRAORDINARY CHANGES TO THE SUBJECT OUTLINE…………………………………………………………… 5

COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 5

ATTENDANCE REQUIREMENTS…………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 5

eLEARNING, READINGS, REFERENCES AND MATERIALS……………………………………………………………. 5

REQUIRED TEXT(S)……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 6

KEY REFERENCES…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 6

LECTURES……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 7

Lecture Recording……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 9

Your Privacy – Lecture Recording……………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 9

SECTION B: ASSESSMENT………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 11

ASSESSMENT LEARNING OUTCOME MATRIX……………………………………………………………………………… 13

Types of Assessment and Collaboration………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 13

Submission, Retention and Collection of Written Assessment…………………………………………………………………….. 14

Submitting Assessment Tasks………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 14

EXTENSIONS…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 14

LATE SUBMISSION OF ASSESSMENT TASKS………………………………………………………………………………… 14

SUPPLEMENTARY ASSESSMENTS…………………………………………………………………………………………………… 14

SUPPLEMENTARY EXAMINATIONS………………………………………………………………………………………………… 15

UOW GRADE DESCRIPTORS……………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 15

MINIMUM PERFORMANCE REQUIREMENTS…………………………………………………………………………………. 15

STUDENT WORKLOAD……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 15

REVIEW AND APPEAL OF ACADEMIC DECISIONS………………………………………………………………………. 15

ASSESSMENT QUALITY CYCLE……………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 16

COLLECTION………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 16

RETENTION…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 16

SCALING………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 16

LEARNING ANALYTICS……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 16

ASSURANCE OF LEARNING………………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 16

ACADEMIC INTEGRITY………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 16

TURNITIN………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 17

REFERENCING……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 18

THE HARVARD SYSTEM OF REFERENCING AND CITATION OF INTERNET SOURCES………… 18

ACADEMIC COMPLAINTS………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 18

SECTION C: GENERAL ADVICE TO STUDENTS – Policies and Procedures…………………………………………. 18

SECTION A: GENERAL INFORMATION

SUBJECT DESCRIPTION

This subject provides students with detailed knowledge of the complexities of initiating, developing, managing and exploiting innovation and entrepreneurship opportunities within the commercial constraints of contemporary business.

STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES

On successful completion of this subject, students will be able to:

  1. Critically appraise key characteristics of entrepreneurial opportunities
  2. Justify the selection of creative and innovative processes, techniques, methodologies and models for the development of entrepreneurial opportunities
  3. Critically analyse the management of entrepreneurship opportunities and propose improvements

UPDATES TO THIS SUBJECT

The School is committed to continual improvement in teaching and learning. In assessing teaching and learning practices in a subject, the School takes into consideration student feedback from many sources. These sources include direct student feedback to tutors and lecturers, feedback through Student Services and Business and Law Central, responses to the Subject and Course Evaluation Surveys. These important student responses are used to make ongoing changes to subjects and courses. This information is also used to inform systemic comprehensive reviews of subjects and courses.

EXTRAORDINARY CHANGES TO THE SUBJECT OUTLINE

In extraordinary circumstances the provisions stipulated in this Subject Outline may require amendment after the Subject Outline has been distributed. All students enrolled in the subject will be notified and have the opportunity to provide feedback in relation to the proposed amendment, where practicable, prior to the amendment being finalised.

COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES

Course Learning Outcomes can be found in the Course Handbook https://www.uow.edu.au/handbook/index.html.

ATTENDANCE REQUIREMENTS

The Faculty of Business and Law expects all students to actively use and review all online content provided for this subject. All types of participation will be monitored and is required in order to have a reasonable attempt at this subject.

eSULBEJAECRTNeLIENAGR,NRINEGADINGS, REFERENCES AND MATERIALS

The University uses the eLearning system Moodle to support all coursework subjects. The subject Moodle site can be accessed via:

https://moodle.uowplatform.edu.au/course/view.php?id=22813

IN ADDITION TO THE UOW ONLINE WOLLONGONG DISTANCE MOODLE SITE YOU WILL ALSO HAVE ACCESS TO THE REMOTE STUDY SUPPORT SITE.

Remote Study Support Moodle site (TCHR054_20) is accessible to support your studies from remote locations around the globe until you can return to on campus study. This site will appear as an additional site on your list of active Moodle subject sites.

This site contains comprehensive information with a range of resources related to teaching and learning as well as other student support information.

TRhEerQe isUnIoRreEquDiredTtEexXt foTr(tShi)s subject. All readings are e-readings to be accessed via Moodle.

Textbooks are available online from the University Bookshop at https://unishop.uow.edu.au/

KEY REFERENCES

The recommended readings below are not intended as an exhaustive list of references. Students should also use the library catalogue and databases to locate additional resources.

Articles

Mathews, J. & Wrigley, C., (2017), Design and Design Thinking in Business Management Higher Education,

Journal of Learning Design, Vol 10, No. 1, pp. 41-54

Nambisan, S, Wright, M & Feldman, M (2019), ‘The digital transformation of innovation and Entrepreneurial: Progress, challenge and key themes’, Research policy, vol. 48, no 8, p. 103773-

Price, O., Boud, D. & Scheeres H. (2012) in S. Høyrup et al. (eds.), ‘Employee-Driven Innovation’, Chapter 4 ‘Creating Work: Employee-Driven Innovation through Work Practice Reconstruction’, Palgrave Publishers, pp. 77-91.

Papageorgiou, K, Hassi, L, Bragos R, Charosky G, Levaratto, L & Ramos-Castro J (2021), ‘Prototyping the future of learning: reflections after seven iterations of challenged based innovation (2014-2020)’ CERN ideaSauare Journal of experimental innovation, vol 5, no 1, pp 5-10.

Robinson D., Davidsson P., Mescht H., and Court P. (2007), ‘How Entrepreneurs Deal with Ethical Challenges

– An Application of the Business Ethics Synergy Star Technique’, Journal of Business Ethics, Vol 71, pp. 411- 423

Blogs

The Viima Blog, ‘Innovation’, https://www.viima.com/blog/topic/innovation

The Viima Blog, ‘Open Innovation’, https://www.viima.com/blog/topic/open-innovation Morikawa (2016), ’16 examples of open innovation – what can we learn from them?’, available: https://www.viima.com/blog/16-examples-of-open-innovation-what-can-we-learn-from-them Podcasts

Blank, S (2018), ‘The difference between innovators and entrepreneurs’, Podcast available: https://soundcloud.com/clearshore/the-difference-between-innovators-and-entrepreneurs

Powell, D (2018), ‘From design thinking to design doing: A chat with IBMs Doug Powell’, available on Rosenfeld Review Podcast: https://soundcloud.com/rosenfeld-media/doug-powell-podcast

Thiel, P (2015), ‘Peter Thiel on luck and billionaires’, Podcast available on Innovation Hub: https://soundcloud.com/innovationhub/peter-thiel-on-luck-and-billionaires Books

Frederick H., O’Connor A., & Kuratko D. (2019), ‘Entrepreneurship Theory / Process / Practice’, (5th Edition), Cengage Learning Australia Pty Ltd.

Mann A, (2018), ‘Future First: How successful leaders turn innovation challenges into new value frontiers’, Routledge, Taylor & Francis Group, London.

Osterwalder A. & Pigneur Y., (2010), ‘Business Model Generation’, John Wiley & Sons Inc.

Twitter #steveblank@sgblank #steveblank@BlankStartups #AUSinnovates

Websites

Blank, S., www.steveblank.com

Blank, S., (2019), ‘McKinsey’s three horizons model defined innovation for years. Here’s why it no longer applies’, available: https://hbr.org/2019/02/mckinseys-three-horizons-model-defined-innovation-for-years-heres- why-it-no-longer-applies

Cleversim., www.cleverism.com/business-model-canvas-complete-guide

Dam, R and Siang, T., (2019), 5 Stages in the Design Thinking Process, Interaction Design Foundation, available: https://www.interaction-design.org/literature/article/5-stages-in-the-design-thinking-process

Forbes Technology Council (FTC). (2019), ‘Long-term success lessons from Tech’s most innovative companies’, pp. 1-5, available: https://www.forbes.com/sites/forbestechcouncil/2019/02/01/long-term-success-lessons-from- techs-most-innovative-companies/#4929d9ce3163

Gemaker., www.ausinnovates.com.au

Kauffman Foundation. (2015), ‘How Entrepreneurs Access Capital and Get Funded’, Entrepreneurship Policy Digest, available: https://www.kauffman.org/what-we-do/resources/entrepreneurship-policy-digest/how- entrepreneurs-access-capital-and-get-funded

Moules, J (2017), ‘The difference between innovation and entrepreneurs’, The Financial Times., available: https://www.ft.com/content/f63ee4c2-6d81-11e7-b9c7-15af748b60d0

Ries, E., www.theleanstartup.com/principles

United Nations, (2017), Sustainable Development Goals, http://www.un.org/sustainabledevelopment/sustainable-development-goals

United Nations Conference on Trade and Development (UNCTAD) (2017), ‘New innovation approaches to support the implementation of the Sustainable Development Goals’, pp. 5-21, available: https://unctad.org/en/pages/PublicationWebflyer.aspx?publicationid=1775

United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) (2017), ‘UNDP Innovation Facility: 2016 Year in Review’, available: https://www.undp.org/content/undp/en/home/librarypage/development-impact/undp-innovation- facility-year-in-review.html

World Economic Forum (WEC) (2019), ‘The global risk report 2019 14th edition’, available: https://www.weforum.org/reports/the-global-risks-report-2019

LECTURES

Lecture Times

UOW may need to change teaching locations, teaching delivery and/or assessment delivery at short notice to ensure the safety and well-being of students and staff in response to the COVID-19 pandemic or other public health requirements.

For up-to-date information on the impact of COVID-19 please refer to your subjects Moodle site. Lectures will be available online, ECHO, in the subject’s Moodle site

Up to date timetable and delivery information is located at http://www.uow.edu.au/student/timetables/index.html

Trimester 1

WeekWeek CommencingTopics CoveredReadings
213 Feb 2023Innovation and Entrepreneurship Introduction   Global need for Innovation and EntrepreneurshipInnovative mindsetPre-recorded lecture content on Moodle Book   Frederick et al. (2016) pp 3 – 4Frederick et al. (2016) pp. 63 – 98 Book.
  Linkages to sustainable developmentInnovation and a whole systems designInnovation and the life cycle assessment (LCA)Subject outline reviewSuccess or disaster presentation requirementsPodcast   Blank, S (2018) PodcastWorld Economic Forum (2019)   Twitter   #steve blank@sgblank#steve blank@BlankStartups#AUSinnovates   Website   Moules, J (2017)UNUNDPWorld Economic Forum (2019)
427 Feb 2023  Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Creativity   Success or disaster presentationsDesign thinking principles & techniquesInnovation and entrepreneurship globallyIncubators and AcceleratorsImportance of a pitchPre-recorded lecture content on Moodle Article   Mathews (2016)Price (2012)   Blog   Morikawa (2016)   Podcast   Thiel (2015)   Website   Dam & Siang (2017)Forbes Technology Council (2019)Gemaker
613 Mar 2023  Innovation and Entrepreneurship Development   Success or disaster presentationsInnovation and entrepreneurship modelsBusiness Canvas Model,Lean Start Up Model,Three Horizon ModelPre-recorded lecture content on Moodle Book   Osterwalder & Pigneur (2010) pp. 14- 44   Blog   The Viima Blog ‘Innovation’The Viima Blog ‘Open Innovation’   Video   Talk at Google (2011)   Website
     Blank, SBlank, S (2019)CleversimRiseUNCTAD (2017)
  8  27 Mar 2023Innovation and Entrepreneurship Growth   Success or disaster presentations (online via the discussion forum)Legal and ethical challengesCapital sourcesMeasuring performancePre-recorded lecture content on Moodle Article   Robinson et al. (2007)   Website   Kauffman Foundation (2015)
  10  10 Apr 2023  Innovation and Entrepreneurship   Future challenges for innovation and entrepreneurshipCase study presentationsYour canvasOsterwalder A. & Pigneur Y., (2010), ‘Business Model Generation’, John Wiley & Sons Inc. Mann, A 2018, Future First: how successful leaders turn innovation challenges into new value frontiers, Routledge, Taylor & Francis Group, London. Papageorgiou, K et al., 2021, ‘Prototyping the future of learning: reflections after seven iterations of Challenge-Based Innovation (2014-2020)’, CERN ideasussare journal of experimental innovations, vol 5, no 1, pp. 5-10. Nambisan, S, Wright, M & Feldman, M 2019, ‘The digital transformation of innovation and entrepreneurship: Progress, challenges and key themes’, Research policy, vol. 48, no. 8, p. 103773–.

Lecture Recording

The University of Wollongong supports the recording of UOW educational content as a supplemental study tool, to provide students with equity of access, and as a technology-enriched learning strategy to enhance the student experience.

If you make your own recording of a lecture, class, seminar, workshop or any other educational session provided as part of your course of study you can only do so with the explicit permission of the lecturer and those people who are also being recorded.

You may only use educational content recorded through the delivery of subject or course content, whether they are your own or recorded by the university, for your own educational purposes. Recordings cannot be altered, shared or published on another platform, without permission of the University, and to do so may contravene the University’s Copyright Policy, Privacy Policy, Intellectual Property Policy, IT Acceptable Use Policy and Student Conduct Rules. Unauthorised sharing of recordings may also involve a breach of law under the Copyright Act 1969.

Most lectures in this subject will be recorded, when they are scheduled in venues that are equipped with lecture recording technology and made available via the subject Moodle site within 48 hours.

Your Privacy – Lecture Recording

In accordance with the Student Privacy & Disclosure Statement, when undertaking our normal teaching and learning activities, the University may collect your personal information. This collection may occur incidentally

during the recording of lectures in equipped venues (i.e. when your identity can be ascertained by your image, voice or opinion), or via the delivery of online content therefore the University further advises students that:

  • Lecture recordings are made available to students, university staff, and affiliates, securely on the university’s IT Platforms and via the subject Moodle eLearning site;
  • Recordings are made available only for the purpose for which they were recorded, for example, as a supplemental study tool or to support equity and access to educational resources;
  • Recordings are stored securely for up to four years

If you have any concerns about the use or accuracy of your personal information collected in a lecture recording, you may approach your Subject Coordinator to discuss your particular circumstances.

The University is committed to ensuring your privacy is protected. If you have a concern about how your personal information is being used or managed, please refer to the University’s Privacy Policy or consult our Privacy webpage https://www.uow.edu.au/privacy/

SECTION B: ASSESSMENT

AssessmentForm of Assessment%
Assessment 1Report35%
Assessment 2Report30%
Assessment 3Presentation35%
 TOTAL100%

Please note: Copies of student work may be retained by the University in order to facilitate quality assurance of assessment processes.

A formative assessment activity (with written or verbal feedback) will be conducted before census date – please see UOW Key Dates.

Assessment 1Report-Case study analysis report
TopicSuccess or Disaster
LengthStudents must submit a 1000-word case study analysis report on an innovative / entrepreneurial success OR disaster and present an overview of the selected example during class within a 3–5-minute pitch style presentation.
Weighting35%
Due DateWeek beginning 20 Feb 2023 (In lecture in Trimester 1 Week 3) Final submission time: 11:30pm
Type of CollaborationIndividual assessment
Marking CriteriaDemonstrates;   Context of purpose of communication (consideration of audience, purpose, and circumstance surrounding presentation task)Content descriptionGenre and disciplinary conventions (organisation, presentation, content, formatting and stylistic choices)Sources and evidenceControl of syntax and mechanics
Style and FormatYou are presenting a case study analysis report during the week 3 class. The style of presenting the report is at the students’ discretion but the must be presented within a 3–5-minute time frame. Along with the presentation, your 1000 word case study analysis report is due in Week 3 class (Presentation during the week 3 class and submit 1000 words report online on or before 11.30pm, Sunday of Week 3). Single spaced, Times New Roman Font size 11.
Assessment SubmissionOnline Via Moodle   This assessment has been set up to be checked by Turnitin, a tool which helps you check whether you have referenced correctly. You can submit your assessment task to Turnitin prior to the due date and Turnitin will give you an originality report. You may then make any changes that may be required and resubmit your final version by the due date.
Assessment ReturnFeedback will be received within 1 week of submission.
Detailed InformationStudents research individuals and companies that have engaged in successful and disastrous innovation and/or entrepreneurship ventures. Students are to select an individual or company and critically appraise key characteristics of its success or disaster, answering the questions; a) Justify from your review of the literature on the selected case study, is/was this innovation and/or entrepreneurial venture a success or a disaster?
 Discuss the approaches used by the inventor and/or the entrepreneur that led to the success or disaster.Analyse the sustainable development impact of the chosen case study.Suggest some approaches which could be used by the innovator and/or the entrepreneur, justifying your recommendations by reference to the case study context and to academic literature.
Assessment 2Report-Report
TopicWhole Systems Design
Length2500 words, excluding executive summary, references, appendices (if any), tables and other illustrations.
Weighting30%
Due Date26 Mar 2023 (Sunday in Trimester 1 Week 7) Final submission time: 11:30pm
Type of CollaborationIndividual assessment
Marking CriteriaDemonstrates;   Context of purpose of communication (consideration of audience, purpose, and circumstance surrounding writing task)Content descriptionGenre and disciplinary conventions (organisation, presentation, content, formatting and stylistic choices)Sources and evidenceControl of syntax and mechanics
Style and FormatReport including Executive Summary, numbered sections and a table of contents. All references to be cited-in-text and at the end of the report in Harvard format. All system diagrams to be included in body of the report.
Assessment SubmissionOnline Via Moodle
Assessment Return2 weeks after submission.
Detailed InformationApply the concepts of ‘Whole System Design’ and ‘Life Cycle Assessment’ to a product and/or service of your choice in order to redesign for meeting one or more UN Sustainable Development Goals (SDG). Your choice of product/service must be agreed with the lecturer by Week 3 to ensure no duplication with other students. Define the problem by looking at the whole system – draw and describe this going as broadly as you possibly canConduct a life cycle assessment to work out the priority areas within the product/service that you are going to redesign.Brainstorm solutions by looking at the whole system. Describe your innovations here.Compare your possible strategies against cost, performance, environmental and social impacts.Describe what you may need to take this strategy forward – materials, technology.
Assessment 3Presentation-Presentation
TopicCase Study
Length15 mins presentation plus 5 mins question and answer
Weighting35%
Due DateWeek beginning 10 Apr 2023 (In lecture in Trimester 1 Week 10) Final submission time: 12:00pm
Type of CollaborationGroup work
Marking CriteriaDemonstrates;   LanguageOrganisationDeliverySupporting materialClear and consistent central message
Style and FormatSlides, maximum of 8 slides (40%). Assessment of presentation and response to questions (60%).
Assessment SubmissionOnline Via Moodle   This assessment has been set up to be checked by Turnitin, a tool which helps you check whether you have referenced correctly. You can submit your assessment task to Turnitin prior to the due date and Turnitin will give you an originality report. You may then make any changes that may be required and resubmit your final version by the due date.
Assessment ReturnFeedback will be provided after the release of results as there is no examination in this subject.
Detailed InformationCritical analysis of how a pre-selected innovative venture, which will be provided on Moodle, identifies and manages innovation and entrepreneurial opportunities. Students are to evaluate how this compares with the recommendations in academic literature and recommend improvements, justified with reference to academic literature.

ASSESSMENT LEARNING OUTCOME MATRIX

Learning OutcomesMeasures – Assessment weighting
Success or DisasterWhole Systems DesignCase Study
(35%)(30%)(35%)
Critically appraise key characteristics of entrepreneurial opportunities
Justify the selection of creative and innovative processes, techniques, methodologies and models for the development of entrepreneurial opportunities 
Critically analyse the management of entrepreneurship opportunities and propose improvements

Types of Assessment and Collaboration

Collaboration between students during the preparation of subject assessment tasks or case studies is only permitted dependent upon the category of assessment task declared by the subject coordinator and as printed in the Subject Outline.

Type 1 – At home exams (online) or take-home exams No collaboration of any kind is permitted between students or anyone else during formation and preparation of the contents of the student submission.

Type 2 – Group work: Collaboration is permitted between students in the same group but not with students in other groups.

Type 3 – Individual assessment: Collaboration is permitted between students only in the form of general discussion pertaining to relevant concepts or potential issues to be dealt with in completing the assessment. However, collaboration must not proceed to the point where it contributes directly to the final submission produced by the student. Joint planning of the actual contents of a student’s submission is not permitted. Where the assessment requires formulation of a set of recommendations, a problem solution, or a specific course of action, collaboration is not permitted during their formulation. Needless to say, collaboration is not permitted during the actual preparation and writing of the student submission.

Type 4 – Open assessment: Collaboration with other students is permitted, subject to the normal rules governing plagiarism and academic integrity. That is, direct use of ideas contributed by others must be acknowledged.

Type 5 – Individual assessment and group work: Collaboration is permitted with other members of your group, but not with other groups for the group work component. No collaboration is permitted with other members of your group for the individual component.

Submission, Retention and Collection of Written Assessment

Submitting Assessment Tasks

Assessed work must be handed in by the date and time listed under each assessment task. All assessment tasks must represent the enrolled student’s own ORIGINAL work and must not have been previously submitted for assessment in any formal course of study.

Tasks must be submitted by the method outlined against each assessment task. Students may not e-mail or post assessment tasks unless specifically requested by or with the prior approval of the Subject Coordinator. Where an assessment task is submitted electronically (via Moodle), the procedure for electronic submission will be set out on the Moodle site.

EXTENSIONS

Extensions of time to submit material for assessment can only be requested in advance of the due date for an assessment activity through the Academic Consideration process on SOLS. For more information, please refer to the Student Academic Consideration Policy at: http://www.uow.edu.au/about/policy/UOW058721.html

LATE SUBMISSION OF ASSESSMENT TASKS

Assessed work submitted late will be penalised by the deduction of 10 percent of the maximum possible mark for that assessment per working day or part thereof. The operation of this rule will not result in a negative mark being carried forward.

This penalty for late submission may be waived upon presentation of a medical certificate of illness for a relevant period, or upon evidence of untoward or approved circumstances that fall under the Student Academic Consideration Policy (see Sydney Business School Moodle site https://moodle.uowplatform.edu.au/course/view.php?id=26396)

SUPPLEMENTARY ASSESSMENTS

Supplementary assessment may be offered to students whose performance in this subject is close to that required to pass the subject and are otherwise identified as meriting an offer of a supplementary assessment. The Subject Coordinator will determine the precise form of supplementary assessment at the time the offer of a supplementary is made. In some circumstances you may be offered a supplementary exam. For more information about Supplementary Exams refer to https://www.uow.edu.au/student/exams/timetabledates/index.html

SUPPLEMENTARY EXAMINATIONS

Students who suffer illness or other circumstances beyond their control which are likely to affect their academic performance on the day of an examination should not attempt the exam. These students should obtain a Medical Certificate or other approved supporting documentation and follow the University’s Academic Consideration application process to apply for a supplementary exam. The school will not approve students to re-sit an examination. See Section C, Student Academic Consideration Policy for further details.

Students approved for a supplementary examination will receive a minimum of five (5) days’ notice via SOLSMail, regarding the examination date, time and location. Supplementary exam period dates can be found at https://www.uow.edu.au/student/exams/timetabledates/index.html.

UOW GRADE DESCRIPTORS

The UOW Grade Descriptors are general statements that communicate what our grades represent, in terms of standards of performance, and provide a frame of reference to ensure that assessment practice across the University is appropriate, consistent and fair. Grade Descriptors are expressed in general terms so that they are applicable to a broad range of disciplines. For more information on the UOW grade descriptors see: https://www.uow.edu.au/student/exams/results/

MINIMUM PERFORMANCE REQUIREMENTS

To be eligible to pass this subject, students must complete all assessment tasks for this subject. In addition, you must achieve a total mark of 50% or over for all assessment tasks and obtain a minimum of 50% in the final examination or major piece of assessment (where there is no final exam).

In accordance with the General Course Rules where a student gains a mark of 50 or greater and does not meet the specified level in an assessment task required to pass the subject, a Technical Fail (TF) grade for the subject will appear on their Academic Transcript. Where a Technical Fail is given the following applies:

  1. Failure of the subject;
    1. a TF without a mark will be granted;
    1. a TF will be presented on the student’s academic transcript;
    1. The allocated mark of 49 will be used as the WAM calculation for subjects at all levels.

Failure to complete all assessment tasks will normally result in failure of the entire subject, other marks notwithstanding.

Students should note that each credit point normally requires about 2 hours of study per week. Thus, a 6-credit point subject requires that students commit about 12 hours study a week, including attendance at lectures and tutorials

Students who fail a subject will not normally be eligible for a supplementary exam but may be approved if extenuating circumstances exist. Approval for a supplementary exam in these circumstances needs to be given by the relevant Head of School and Faculty Assessment Committee. Students who believe they may be eligible, and who have not already been advised accordingly, should consult their Lecturer or Subject Coordinator.

STUDENT WORKLOAD

Students should note that UOW policy equates 1 credit point with 2 hours of study per week, including lectures and tutorials/workshops/practicals, self-directed study and work on assessment tasks. For example, in a 6-credit point subject, a total of 12 hours of study per week is expected.

REVIEW AND APPEAL OF ACADEMIC DECISIONS

A student may request an explanation of a mark for an assessment task or a final grade for a subject consistent with the student’s right to appropriate and useful feedback on their performance in an assessment task. A student

may also seek further explanation for other academic decisions such as Academic Consideration, Supplementary Assessment or Credit for Prior Learning. If a student is not satisfied with the explanation, or have further concerns, they may have grounds for a formal review. For further information refer to https://documents.uow.edu.au/about/policy/students/UOW189967.html

ASSESSMENT QUALITY CYCLE

The UOW Assessment Quality Cycle provides a level of assurance that assessment practices across the University are appropriate, consistent, and fair. Quality assurance activities are undertaken to support the continuous improvement of assessment and promote good practices in relation to assessment design, marking and review of the subject prior to subsequent delivery.

COLLECTION

Assessment items will normally be returned to students within three (3) weeks of the due date. Assessment tasks which are relevant to the final examination for the subject will be marked and available for collection prior to the study week before the final examination.

RETENTION

The university retains records of student academic work in accordance with the University Records Management Policy and the State Records Act 1988 and uses these records in accordance with the University Privacy Policy and the Privacy and Personal Information Protection Act 1998.

SCALING

Marks awarded for any assessment task or part of any assessment task, including an examination may be subject to scaling at the end of the session. Marks will be scaled only when unpredicted circumstances occur and in order to ensure fairness of marking across groups of students. The method of scaling will depend on the type of scaling required by the circumstances. When scaling is deemed necessary, it will follow a detailed consideration by the Unit Assessment Committee and/or the Faculty Assessment Committee of the marks of the group of students concerned. Scaling will not affect any individual student’s rank order within their cohort. For more information please refer to Standards for the Finalisation of Student Results – Schedule 1: Scaling Guidelines https://www.uow.edu.au/about/policy/UOW039331.html for details.

LEARNING ANALYTICS

Learning Analytics data (such as student engagement with Moodle, access to recorded lectures, University Library usage, task marks, and use of SOLS) may be used by the Subject Coordinator and your faculty’s Head of Students to assist in analysing student engagement, and to identify and recommend support to students who may be at risk of failure. If you have questions about the kinds of data the University uses, how we collect it, and how we protect your privacy in the use of this data, please refer to https://www.uow.edu.au/about/privacy/index.html.

ASSURANCE OF LEARNING

What will students learn in their degree?

The Faculty of Business and Law ensures each degree has specified course learning outcomes which assure that students attain knowledge, skills, and competencies at the appropriate qualification level. These course learning outcomes align with the curriculum. These are evaluated through existing assessment tasks within subjects.

The faculty uses Assurance of Learning (AOL) to assess how students meet the specified course learning outcomes and how well our graduates have achieved these. AOL collects and analyses student results data to continuously improve degrees offered by the faculty which leads to improved student learning.

ACADEMIC INTEGRITY

The University provides detailed information about how to acknowledge the work of others: https://www.uow.edu.au/academic-integrity/students/index.html

The University’s Academic Integrity and Plagiarism Policy, school moodle sites and subject guides clearly set out the University’s expectation that students submit only their own original work for assessment and avoid plagiarising the work of others or cheating. Re-using any of your own work (either in part or in full) which you have submitted previously for assessment is not permitted without appropriate acknowledgement. Plagiarism can be detected and has led to students being expelled from the University.

The use by students of any website that provides access to essays or other assessment items (sometimes marketed as ‘resources’), is extremely unwise. Students who provide an assessment item (or provide access to an assessment item) to others, either directly or indirectly (for example by uploading an assessment item to a website) are considered by the university to be intentionally or recklessly helping other students to cheat.

Uploading an assessment task, subject outline or other course materials without express permission of the University is considered academic misconduct and students place themselves at risk of being expelled from the University.

Students should visit the following University website and become familiar with the University’s policy on plagiarism https://www.uow.edu.au/about/policy/UOW058648.html.

PLAGIARISM PREVENTION

The school has an e-learning module which aims to orientate you with the knowledge and resources to:

  • avoid problems related to plagiarism
  • develop your capacity to integrate evidence into your arguments
  • reference correctly.

The online module is openly available for use by students at any stage in their degree. You are strongly encouraged to use the module to help in assessing the academic integrity of your written work. The module can be accessed via https://moodle.uowplatform.edu.au/course/view.php?id=5679.

TURNITIN

Turnitin is a service used by UOW as a tool educating students about the importance of correct citations and referencing techniques in addition to identifying where students have copied or reused the work of others – known as plagiarism. For tips about writing with academic integrity and avoiding plagiarism please see above: Academic Integrity and Plagiarism and https://www.uow.edu.au/student/services/ld/students/UOW021315.html

The Turnitin system checks each student’s written assessment against electronic text;

  • on the publicly accessible Internet,
  • in published works (including ABI/Inform, Periodical Abstracts, Business dateline, and electronic books),
  • on the ProQuest and Gale commercial databases, and
  • in every assignment previously submitted to Turnitin

When a student submits his/her written assessment, the system generates an ‘originality report’ that highlights the similarity found between the assessment and all the sources checked by Turnitin. Turnitin does not check that references are in the correct Harvard format. It is the student’s responsibility to check that all references follow the Harvard format detailed on https://uow.libguides.com/refcite/uowharvard.

It is compulsory for all students to submit all written assignments (final version) in a word (.doc/.docx) format into the Turnitin system regardless of whether it is electronic, or paper based. Your lecturer will advise whether a hard copy of the report is required with any paper-based assignment submission.

Students are encouraged to submit drafts of their assignment to Turnitin before the due date, thus enabling students to check their referencing and rectify any issues before submission of the final version.

  1. Use one document name only for each assignment that includes your UOW student number
  2. Any resubmissions must use the same document name as the original submission
  3. References must be included in your Turnitin submission
  4. Do not include the assignment topic question at the beginning of your submission
  5. Where a paper-based copy is required with the assignment submission, the originality report provided with the assignment submission must be consistent with your last submission to Turnitin

Failure to comply with these requirements may result in penalties being applied. Please access the Moodle site for this subject for further Turnitin details.

REFERENCING

At University it is necessary to acknowledge the sources of information and ideas that you have incorporated in your assessment tasks. Failure to do this thoroughly may result in accusations of plagiarism: this is the academic equivalent of stealing (because by not acknowledging someone else’s work, you are presenting it as your own). Plagiarism is taken very seriously by the University and may result in expulsion from the University.

Referencing is not only about acknowledging other people’s work; accurate referencing and lists of references are beneficial when researching a topic as they allow the reader to follow up information and read further in the area. In a sense, references provide readers with clues to help them explore different avenues of a topic. This aspect of referencing will become more valuable to you as you progress in your studies.

There is a correct procedure that must be followed when referencing and using footnotes. Not complying with these set techniques and format will most likely result in loss of marks. When writing an essay it is easiest to reference as you go, making sure you are writing down all relevant information. This will save hours trying to find the source again in the library.

THE HARVARD SYSTEM OF REFERENCING AND CITATION OF INTERNET SOURCES

The Faculty of Business and Law uses the Harvard system of referencing. This system makes use of short references within the body of the text. It is supplemented by a detailed list of references at the end of the text, which provides all the information necessary to find the source material. In-text references include the author and year of publication, and where necessary the page number(s).

It is necessary for students to reference all sources used in their written work, including file transfer protocol sites, worldwide web sites, telnet sites, synchronous communications (MOOs, MUDs, IRC, etc.) GOPHER sites, email, Listserv and Newsgroup citations.

It is the responsibility of students to ensure that they are familiar with the Harvard system of referencing and with the accepted Faculty of Business and Law practice for referencing electronic material and that they use it accurately in all written work submitted. Students should consult the following University Library website for a detailed explanation of the Harvard system of referencing and examples of how to reference electronic material https://uow.libguides.com/refcite/uowharvard

ACADEMIC COMPLAINTS

In accordance with the Coursework Student Academic Complaints Policy, a student may request an explanation of a mark for an assessment task or a final grade for a subject consistent with the student’s right to appropriate and useful feedback on their performance in an assessment task. Refer to the Coursework Student Academic Complaints Policy for further information – http://www.uow.edu.au/about/policy/UOW058653.html

SECTION C: GENERAL ADVICE TO STUDENTS –

Policies and Procedures

For general information on university policies and procedures relevant to students, and for details about the range of Student Services available, please see Student Resources, Policies and Procedures which can be accessed online at https://www.uow.edu.au/business-law/current-students/policies-and-procedures/.

For further information on University of Wollongong (UOW) and Sydney Business School Policies please refer to the moodle site at https://moodle.uowplatform.edu.au/course/view.php?id=26396

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