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NUTD101 Introduction To Nutrition

07 May 2023 12:46 PM | UPDATED 11 months ago

NUTD101 Introduction To Nutrition :

NUTD101 Introduction To Nutrition
NUTD101 Introduction To Nutrition

NUTD101 Introduction To Nutrition Assessment 2 – Written Assessment

    PurposeTo demonstrate your application of knowledge and skills developed in the unit. To improve your understanding of dietary assessment techniques and how to interpret data.
            Learning Outcome(s) assessedLO1    Describe the nutritive and non-nutritive components of food, (macro- and micronutrients, other bioactive components and non- nutrients), their sources and their role in health and exercise (GA5) LO2 Understand the principles and methods of measurement and estimation of nutritional and energy requirements of the general and athletic populations (GA4, GA5) LO4    Justify the choice of techniques for assessment of dietary intake, including data collection, analysis and interpretation in individuals, groups and populations (GA5, GA8, GA10) LO5    Articulate evidence-based scientific principles and benefits of dietary principles for the general and athletic population including cultural factors that may influence food choices and the consequences of poor nutrition in these populations (GA4, GA5, GA8)
Weighting25%
  Length and/or formatWritten text; 1000 words (+/-10%) including in-text citations, excluding reference list
Due date(s)Week 9

NUTD101 Introduction To Nutrition Task description

For this assessment task, you will analyse a client’s three-day food and fluid diary and interpret the findings using FoodWorks, a computerised nutrient analysis program. This assessment has two parts: 1) a 3-day food diary analysis using FoodWorks; and 2) a report interpreting the FoodWorks output with respect to the Australian Dietary Guidelines and the Nutrient Reference Values. You will support your work with evidence-based findings.

Part A – FoodWorks output

You are required to enter a 3-day food and drink diary using FoodWorks, a computerised nutrient analysis program. You will analyse Charlotte’s food diary, calculate the food and nutrient intake, assess the nutrition profile, and make recommendations using a peer-reviewed, evidence- based approach. More information about Charlotte is provided in Appendix 1.

You will enter the 3-day diary into one food record and interpret the average of the 3 days. The FoodWorks analyses are to be attached to your assignment as an appendix at the end of your report. It should include:

  • 3-day food record
  • Nutritional analysis which includes the EAR, AI, UL, RDI, SDTs and Ratio energy from protein, fat, carbohydrates, fibre and alcohol
  • Recipes including nutritional analysis.

Part B: Written text (interpretation of data)

For this part, you are required to interpret the FoodWorks output (Part A) with respect to the

Australian Dietary Guidelines and the Nutrient Reference Values (NRV’s), and specific nutrients.

You will need to respond to the following 5 parts in paragraph form. Each response requires in-text referencing. The word count is a guide only.

Paragraph 1 (150-200 words)

Using a table, compare your client’s food intake against the Australian Guide to Healthy Eating’s “Recommended Number of Serves for Adults” then discuss whether your client is meeting recommendations and what foods or drinks are contributing/not contributing to these recommendations.

Paragraph 2 (250-300 words)

Compare your FoodWorks analysis against the Nutrient Reference Values to:

  1. Assess whether your client is in energy balance and discuss any implications of this.
  2. Identify whether your client is at any risk of any nutritional deficiencies or excesses and consider the implications of these deficiencies or excesses. Discuss how the foods in the diet are contributing to these deficiencies or excesses.

Paragraph 3 (200-300 words)

  1. Prepare a table comparing carbohydrate, protein, and fat intake (including saturated fat) as a % contribution to total energy intake against the Acceptable Macronutrient Distribution Ranges (AMDRs). See Appendix 2, Table 1 which can be used as a template.
  2. Select the appropriate carbohydrate and protein requirements based on your client’s activity levels. Prepare a table comparing the client’s carbohydrate and protein intake expressed as g/kg BW/day against your selected requirements. See Appendix 2, Table 2, 3 & 4.
  3. Discuss whether the client meets the recommendations for carbohydrate and protein intake with respect to the AMDRs the recommendations identified in part b). What are the implications of not meeting these recommendations?

Use peer-reviewed evidence to support your claims (e.g. references from websites are not permitted, unless they are government or peak body).

Paragraph 4 (50-100 words)

Using the Schofield equation and the information contained in Appendix 3, calculate the client’s daily energy requirements (showing the appropriate working and units). Justify the activity factor you selected.

  • Schofield (1985) RMR in MJ

Males 18-30 years: 0.063 (wt) + 2.896; Males 31-60 years: 0.048 (wt) + 3.653

Females 18-30 years: 0.062 (wt) + 2.036; Females 31-60: 0.034 (wt) + 3.538

Paragraph 5 (200-300 words)

Make 5 food/drink modifications based on your food diary that could improve your overall nutritional status. Each claim must be supported with nutritional reasoning using peer-reviewed journal references to support your claims (references from websites are not permitted, unless government or peak body,). Make your recommendations foodbased, not nutrient-based. Use

peer-reviewed evidence to support your claims (references from websites are not permitted, unless government or peak body).

Notes:

  • The food record should be entered as a single record and reflect the average intake over 3 days
  • The analysis should be attached as an appendix (the last part of the report). You can use a PDF combiner to combine your documents.
  • The tables will contribute to your word count.

Submission requirements

Your submission requires:

  1. A cover sheet that includes:
    1. your full name and student ID number
    1. subject code and title
    1. assessment title
    1. word count including in-text citations, excluding reference list and appendices
  2. Structure in paragraph form. Do not use titles for each paragraph.
  3. Referencing:
    1. APA 7 referencing required
    1. In-text referencing is required in the paragraphs
    1. Reference List at the end of the document
  4. Appendices – include all FoodWorks output data as specified in Part A.

Time frame

WeekTask
5Introduction to Assessment 2.
6Workshop 6 introduces Nutrition Analysis and how to complete a food diary.
7Workshop 7 will introduce FoodWorks and how to complete a nutritional analysis on a 3-day food diary.
7-8Time will be available in your Workshop to continue working on these parts of the assessment.
9Submit via Turnitin in the Assessment 2 tab on LEO.
11–12Individual grades and feedback will be returned via Turnitin within 3 weeks of submission.

Resources

Supporting resources for this this assessment can be found in LEO in the ‘Assessment 2’ section. They include:

Appendix 1: Client details

Charlotte is a female student who has been going to the gym for 2 years (height 170cm; weight 54kg; D.O.B 18/4/2000). When she is not studying, she is working as a waiter at a local restaurant. Her training and work schedule is as follows:

Monday: 1 hour weights session, 4-hour work shift Tuesday: 30 mins strenuous running, 4-hour work shift Wednesday: 1 hour weights session

Thursday: 60 min light cycling

Friday: 1 hour weights session, 4-hour work shift Saturday: Day off

Sunday: Day off

Day 1 (Thursday)Food itemAmount
BreakfastPikelets4 regular pikelets
 Honey1 tablespoon
 Hard-boiled eggs2 eggs
Morning TeaMango and Passionfruit yoghurt (full fat)5 tablespoons
 Untoasted, nut-free muesli2 tablespoons
 Takeaway cappuccino (full fat soy, no sugar)1 small cup
LunchCorn tortilla1 tortilla
 Chicken schnitzel (no added fat)1 medium
 Tomato3 slices
 Iceberg lettuce2 leaves
Afternoon teaRice crackers (cheese flavour)12 crackers
 Apple juice200ml
DinnerPork Carbonara – see recipe1 serve
OtherWater2 litres
Day 2 (Friday)Food itemAmount
BreakfastShortcut bacon2 rashers
 Fried egg1 regular
 Olive oil1 teaspoon
 Turkish roll1 regular roll
 BBQ sauce1 tablespoon
Morning TeaScotch fingers2 biscuits
 White tea1 cup
LunchStore-bought chicken and vegetable pie1 single serve pie
Afternoon TeaLCM Rice Bubbles Bars2 regular
DinnerHomemade pizza – see recipe1 serve
OtherWater2 litres
Day 3 (Saturday)Food itemAmount
BreakfastPlain croissant1 regular
 Cappuccino (full-cream milk, no sugar)1 small
LunchMcDonald’s Cheeseburger meal1 Cheeseburger 1 Small fries 1 Small diet Coke
Afternoon teaCinnamon doughnut2 regular
 Iced coffee (full cream milk + ice cream)1 large
DinnerSushi roll – California1 roll
 Sushi roll – Chicken and avocado1 roll
OtherWater2 litres

Recipes

Notes: Where relevant, assume ingredients are raw and assume 100% yield.

Pork Sausage Carbonara4 serves
Spaghetti (dry)325g
Pork sausage500g
Olive oil1 tablespoon
Light thickened cream300ml
Parmesan cheese¾ cup
Baby spinach180g
Homemade PizzaServes 2
Lebanese bread2 regular sized breads
Pizza sauce3 tablespoons
Fetta cheese (regular fat)150g
Salami80g
Cherry tomatoes100g

Appendix 2: Macronutrient recommendations

Table 1: Percentage contribution of macronutrients to total energy intake

  Nutrient% total energy/day
  Acceptable Macronutrient Distribution Ranges  Client’s macronutrient distribution ranges
  Carbohydrate  45-65       %
Protein15-25     %
Fat20-35 (< 10 saturated fat)     %      %

Australian Government. National Health and Medical Research Council. (n.d.) Nutrient Reference Values. Summary of chronic disease.

https://www.eatforhealth.gov.au/nutrient-reference-values/chronic-disease/summary

Table 2: Estimated carbohydrate requirements

Activity levelg CHO/kg BW/day
(i) Light – Low intensity or skill-based activities3 – 5
(ii) Moderate – Moderate exercise program (e.g., ~1 h per day)5 – 7
(iii) High – Endurance program (e.g., 1-3 h/d of mod-high-intensity exercise)6 – 10
(iv) Very high – Extreme commitment (e.g., >4-5 h/d mod-high-intensity exercise)8 – 12

Thomas, Erdman, K. A., & Burke, L. M. (2016). Position of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, Dietitians of Canada, and the American College of Sports Medicine: Nutrition and Athletic Performance. Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, 116(3), 501–528. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jand.2015.12.006

Table 3: Estimated protein requirements

Activity levelProtein intake (g/kg BW/d)
Sedentary men and women0.8 – 1.0
Elite endurance athlete1.6
Moderate intensity endurance athlete1.2
Recreation endurance athlete0.8 – 1.0
Football and power sports1.4 – 1.7
Resistance athlete (early training)1.5 – 1.7
Resistance athlete (steady state)1.0 – 1.2

NOTE: Female athletes ~ 10-20% lower protein requirements than male athletes

Tanopolsky, M. (2010). Protein and amino acid needs for bulking up. In L. Burke & V. Deakin (eds.), Clinical Sports Nutrition (4th ed., pp. 80). McGraw Hill.

Table 4: Template for Part 3b

 Selected activity levelClient’s intake
Carbohydrate  
Protein  
NUTD101 Introduction To Nutrition

Appendix 3: Calculating daily energy requirements: Schofield equation Step 1

To calculate Basal Metabolic Rate (BMR) in MJ (megajoules = 1000kJ)/day, use the appropriate equation in Table 1. You need gender, age, and weight for this equation.

Table 1: Basal Metabolic Rate (BMR) in MJ/day (Schofield Equation)

 Age (years)Equation = BMR
  Men18– 30(0.063 x wt) + 2.896
30– 60(0.048 x wt) + 3.653
  Women18– 30(0.062 x wt) + 2.036
30– 60(0.034 x wt) + 3.538
NUTD101 Introduction To Nutrition

*Schofield et al. (1985)

Step 2:

To calculate average daily energy expenditure, you need to determine level of activity (use the average value), in Table 2, then express this as a multiple of BMR.

Table 2: Average daily energy expenditure

Activity LevelMalesFemales
Bed rest1.21.2
Sedentary1.41.4
Light1.51.5
Light – moderate1.71.6
Moderate1.81.7
Heavy2.11.8
NUTD101 Introduction To Nutrition

NUTD101 Introduction to Nutrition

Marking criteria: Assessment 2 – Written Assessment

  CriteriaHigh Distinction (HD) 100–85Distinction (D) 84–75Credit (C) 74–65Pass (P) 64–50Fail (NN) 49–0Marks/ Weighting
      FoodWorks OutputAll items appear in in the analysis and all values appear correct.Almost all items appear in in the analysis and almost all values appear correct.Most items appear in the analysis and are mostly correct. Small sections of the analysis are missing.Most items appear in the tables but does not appear to be correct. One or more parts of the analysis are missing.Analysis not included and/or missing large amounts of information and/or submitted as 3 separate food records.      /10
    Paragraph 1: Comparison and analysis of client’s food intake against the Australian Guide to Healthy EatingTable is included with all values correctTable is included with all values correctTable is included with most values correctTable is included with some values correctTable is missing.          /15
Comprehensive discussion of how food intake compares with the AGHE.Sound discussion of how food intake compares with the AGHE.General discussion of how food intake compares with the AGHE.Some discussion of how food intake compares with the AGHE.Very little or mostly incorrect discussion of how food intake compares with the AGHE.
Highly effective critical and original thinking.Sound critical and original thinking.General critical and original thinking.Some critical and original thinking.Lack of critical and original thinking
      Paragraph 2: Comparison of client’s food intake with the NRVsThorough discussion of how nutrient intakes compared against the NRVs.Sound discussion of how nutrient intakes compared against the NRVs.General discussion of how nutrient intakes compared against the NRVs.Some discussion of how nutrient intakes compared against the NRVs.Very little or mostly incorrect discussion of how nutrient intakes compared against the NRVs.          /15
Thorough discussion of nutritional deficiencies or excesses, and food contributions.Sound discussion of nutritional deficiencies or excesses, and food contributions.General discussion of nutritional deficiencies or excesses, and food contributions.Some discussion of nutritional deficiencies or excesses, and food contributions.Very little or mostly incorrect discussion of nutritional deficiencies or excesses, and food contributions.
NUTD101 Introduction To Nutrition
  CriteriaHigh Distinction (HD) 100–85Distinction (D) 84–75Credit (C) 74–65Pass (P) 64–50Fail (NN) 49–0Marks/ Weighting
      Paragraph 3: Comparisons against recommendations (Tables 3a & 3b)All items appear in tables. All values are correct.All items appear in tables. Most values are correct.Most items appear in tables. Most values are correct.Some items appear in tables. Some values are correct.Missing table/s or few or no items appear on tables. Few or no values are correct.          /15
In depth analysis of diet to AMDR macronutrient recommendations.Sound analysis of diet to AMDR macronutrient recommendations.General analysis of diet to AMDR macronutrient recommendations.Some analysis of diet to AMDR macronutrient recommendations.Lack of analysis of diet to AMDR macronutrient recommendations.
Highly effective critical and original thinking.Effective critical and original thinking.General critical and original thinking.Some critical and original thinking.Lack of critical and original thinking.
        Paragraph 4 Calculations of energyAll calculations are correct.All most all correct calculations.Mostly correct calculations evident.Some incorrect calculations evident.Incorrect calculations evident.          /10
All working shown when calculating answer.All most all working shown when calculating answer.Most working shown when calculating answer.Some working shown when calculating answer.No working shown when calculating answers.
Activity level is factored into the calculation.Activity level is factored into the calculation.Activity level is factored into the calculation.Activity level is factored into the calculation.Activity level is not factored into calculation.
Strong justification for the activity level provided.Effective justification for activity level provided.Mostly correct justification for activity level provided.Some justification for activity level provided.No justification for activity level provided.
      Paragraph 5 Nutrition recommendationsThorough understanding of link between client’s diet and modifications to improve nutritional status.Sound understanding of link between client’s diet and modifications to improve nutritional status.General understanding of link between client’s diet and modifications to improve nutritional status.Some understanding of link between client’s diet and modifications to improve nutritional status.Lack of understanding of the link between client’s diet and modifications to improve nutritional status.        /15
Highly effective critical thinking and original thinking.Effective critical thinking and original thinking.General critical thinking and original thinking.Some critical thinking and original thinking.Lack of critical and original thinking.
  CriteriaHigh Distinction (HD) 100–85Distinction (D) 84–75Credit (C) 74–65Pass (P) 64–50Fail (NN) 49–0Marks/ Weighting
          Sources and referencesAll references are credible and relevant.Most references are credible and relevant.Most references are credible, but some may lack some relevance.Sufficient references are credible and/or relevant.References are not provided or are not credible and/or relevant.          /10
Accurate use of APA 7 referencing style in all instances.Accurate use of APA 7 referencing style on most occasions.Accurate use of APA 7 referencing style on most occasions. There is some variation of in- text citation format, and/or a few errors in the Reference List.APA 7 referencing style is used on some occasions. There is some variation of in- text citation format, and/or frequent minor errors in the Reference List.APA 7 referencing style not used or has been used with frequent errors. There is major variation of in-text citation format and/or major errors in the Reference List.
                Effective communicationSubmission demonstrates a very high-level communication of the dietary analysis.Submission demonstrates a sound communication of the dietary intake analysis.Submission demonstrates a clear communication of the dietary intake analysis.Submission demonstrates a satisfactory communication of the dietary intake analysis.Submission demonstrates a poor standard of communication of the dietary intake analysis.                /10
The presentation is completely logical, clear, and well writtenThe presentation is mostly logical, clear, and well written.The presentation is mostly logical and clear with some minor written errors.The presentation is somewhat logical and clear with many minor written errors.The presentation is not logical, clear or well written.
The word length limit requirements are met.The word length limit requirements are met but may be slightly too long/short.The word length limit requirements have not been met.
Cover sheet with all details included.Cover sheet with most details included.Cover sheet included with some details missing.Cover sheet may be missing or included with many details missing.
Comments  Total marks/100   %
NUTD101 Introduction To Nutrition
  CriteriaHigh Distinction (HD) 100–85Distinction (D) 84–75Credit (C) 74–65Pass (P) 64–50Fail (NN) 49–0Marks/ Weighting
 Grade 
NUTD101 Introduction To Nutrition

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